Monday, October 31, 2016

Philippians 2:1-4, Psalm 131:1-3, Luke 14:12-14

DAILY HOLY MASS READINGS


If you remain in my word, you will truly be my disciples,
and you will know the truth, says the Lord. Jn 8:31-32


Philippians 2:1-4, Psalm 131:1-3, Luke 14:12-14


Philippians 2:1-4

My soul's beloved, You who are the great I AM have shown us what it means to truly love. John the apostle and evangelist as well as St. Paul speak of the true nature of love which is the nature of God Himself. Love does not place the good of self before the good of the other. We are called to love one another as You have loved us. You lay down Your life for us in love and we in turn are called to lay down our life for one another. It is in dying that we are born to eternal life in You. In his beautiful hymn to love St. Paul reminds us that love is not proud, it is not boastful, it is not conceited, it seeks its own interest. Love readily forgives. Love makes excuses the frailties of others. God is Love and You invite us to love as You do.

Psalm 131:1-3

My soul's beloved, all the great Saints have discovered that it is in being truly little that they are able to grasp the greatness of God. When we understand how insignificant we are before the great I AM whom the heavens cannot contain and the earth is a mere footstool, we who are less than a puff of wind, here today and gone tomorrow, we will recognize that all our striving for the things of earth that are transient is precious time wasted and will never return. However, if like St. Therese of Lisieux, and St. Francis of Assisi we become the least in the Kingdom of God we will have found true peace, content to rest on the breast of the Son of God as the disciple of love did. Help me my soul's beloved with the help of the Holy Spirit to truly recognize my nothingness before You.

Luke 14:12-14

My soul's beloved, today in all the readings of the Holy Mass, we are reminded of the value of being truly humble, truly loving and giving without seeking to receive in return. The world teaches us to cultivate relationships in high places, with those with influence, wealth and power. Those we are eager to help so they in turn will help us. The world largely ignores, or is blind to the poor, the weak, the helpless, the powerless. They are pushed further and further away to the periphery and beyond lest they disturb us with their poverty, their stench, their piteous cries for help. Let us remember the stern, words we will hear at the time of our judgment, if we fail to help those less privileged than ourselves, "Whatever you did to the least of these little ones, you did it to Me."